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Just days after the corroded wreck of the Sewol was lifted from the sea floor, human bones and possessions have been discovered on the long-sunken ferry, South Korean officials announced Tuesday.

Salvage workers "found bones of a dead person on the deck," Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries official Lee Cheol-jo told reporters, according to CNN. "We have found a total of six bones ranging in size from four to 18 centimeters. We believe they came through the windows and opening of the ferry's bow."

Officials in New York, California, and elsewhere say they'll fight Attorney General Jeff Sessions' move to cut off billions in federal grant money to cities that don't share the Trump administration's strict approach to enforcing immigration laws.

"The Trump Administration is pushing an unrealistic and mean spirited executive order," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted last night. "If they want a fight, we'll see them in court."

In the past, entrepreneur Elon Musk has described a "neural lace" that could add a symbiotic digital layer to the human brain. In the future, it seems, he'll try to build that device through a new company, Neuralink.

It's clear from the numbers. Google has a diversity problem.

For the past few years, the company has publicly shared its workplace makeup in a report detailing the race, gender and ethnicity of each employee hired the previous year. Last year, while the number of black employees went up, they still represented only 2 percent of the company's workforce and Google admitted it fell short of its diversity goal.

Pinkies Up! A Local Tea Movement Is Brewing

2 hours ago

On Saturday mornings, the most popular item Minto Island Growers sells at its farmers market booth is not the certified organic carrots, kale or blueberries. It's tea.

The farm grows Camellia sinensis, tea plants, on a half-acre plot in Salem, Ore. The tender leaves are hand picked and hand processed to make 100 pounds of organic, small batch tea.

The choices you make in the face of desperation, the morality of violent resistance to injustice, the ever-widening chasm of social inequality: Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables is unquestionably relevant today. Hugo himself said "I do not know if it will be read by all, but I wrote it for everyone." But at around 1500 pages, the book's sheer size may intimidate some readers — even devoted fans refer to it as "the brick."

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ahmed Kathrada spent decades in jail with Nelson Mandela, then spent the first years of democracy helping to shape the country's government after the fall of apartheid. Kathrada, 87, died in Johannesburg on Tuesday morning.

According to a statement posted by the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation, he "passed away peacefully after a short period of illness, following surgery to the brain."

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